Types of Windows

Have you been thinking about replacing some windows in your home? Do you know what type of window you have, or what you might like to have in its place? Not everyone does. We’ll review the eight types of windows, and maybe share some information you might not already know.

Double-Hung Window – This is the typical type of window found in homes, especially older homes. These have two sashes that slide vertically up and down in the window frame. A sash is a frame holding a pane of glass. If your window only has one working sash, you might have a single-hung window, or your top sash may be painted into its frame.

Image Source: Gerkin Windows & Doors

Casement Window – This type of window opens with a crank in an operating mechanism. The window will open out and be hinged on either the left or right side. Window units may have a combination of fixed and moving casements, where one (or more) windows does not open. If you have a casement window with a mechanism that isn’t working, it might be time to have it replaced.

Awning Window – Thesewindows are hinged at the top and swing out. These are nice for having airflow without allowing rain in. An awning window can also be used in combination with a stationary window, to cut down on the number of moving parts.

Image Source: Andersen Windows

Transom Window – A transom is a strengthening crossbar above a door or window. A transom window is one that is set above the transom. It may or may not operate. Transom windows were common in homes before central heating, and in row houses where the number of exterior windows were limited, to improve airflow in the house.

Image Source: Marvin Windows & Doors

Glider Window – Instead of having sashes that move up and down like a double-hung, glider (or slider) sashes move left or right. One or both may function. These are common with basement windows and newer homes.

Image Source: Andersen Windows

Pass-Through Window – These make entertaining a breeze by connecting your indoor and outdoor areas. They don’t take up as much room as an open door, but still offer the convenience, air-flow and light. These windows can open by sliding the panels into the wall, or folding up to maximize the opening.

Image Source: Gerkin Windows & Doors

Stationary Window – These are just what you might imagine, windows that do not open or move. They can be customized to about any angle or shape, since it is just fitting panes of glass into a frame. A picture window is a stationary window, but is very large compared to other windows in the home.

Image Source: Andersen Windows

Bay or Bow Window – This type of window protrudes from the side of the house, giving you more room inside. They will be a combination of windows, and might include double-hung or casement windows along with a fixed window in the middle.

Image Source: Marvin Windows & Doors

Corner Window – These make the most of great views and provide great design focal points. They are comprised of two or more stationary windows and maximize natural light from multiple directions with minimal visual disruption.

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